Home

Recent Activity

FishA controversial fishing technique has been banned by the European Parliament today.

Pulse fishing has been described as “the marine equivalent of fracking” sending electric shocks through the oceans to make fish living on the seabed leap up to be easily caught in a trawl net.

The Marine Conservation Society say fish seem to be most affected with their nervous system and backbones being damaged in many cases. However there is also concern on the effect repeated electric shocks have on the other animal communities of the sea: those that live in the open water, on the seabed or under it.

Pulse fishing had been allowed across Europe since 2016 for “scientific purposes” although the fishing fleets using the technique were selling their catches commercially. But the vote in the European Parliament is to completely outlaw pulse fishing meaning no-one will now be able to use the technique in the North Sea.

Speaking in the Parliament Chamber Labour MEP Alex Mayer said: 

“For ten years, this technique has been allowed to continue, under the guise of a scientific trial with up to 70 boats operating in North Sea. That's not a scientific experiment it is a commercial fishing operation. We deserve better for the waters off the East Anglian coast.

“I am proud to have voted for a complete ban today.”

Victory For East Anglian Fishermen As Controversial Technique Outlawed

A controversial fishing technique has been banned by the European Parliament today. Pulse fishing has been described as “the marine equivalent of fracking” sending electric shocks through the oceans to...

BuglifeBeetles, bees and bugs, must not pay the price of Brexit, Alex Mayer MEP warned this week as she visited the Peterborough charity Buglife.

The MEP’s visit comes as the Government launches its ‘25 year Environment Plan’. However Buglife is concerned about the future saying EU rules have previously encouraged the government to make environmental improvements.

Matt Shardlow, Buglife CEO, said: “While British politicians in Brussels have been introducing regulations that have transformed wildlife and environmental custodianship across Europe, back in Britain their counterparts and superiors have very largely not matched their zeal for a better future

“The UK has repeatedly behaved petulantly, trying to avoid change and going to lengths to do the absolutely minimum possible to comply with EU legislation. 

“The UK is also to be found blocking new EU efforts to improve air quality, ban harmful pesticides, introduce legislation to protect soils and confirm new measures to check that candidate pesticides do not harm bumblebees or solitary bees.”

Ms Mayer said: “We can’t let the Government use Brexit as an excuse to turn back the clock on environmental regulations. The impact on our ecosystems would be catastrophic. 

“Funnily enough, insects don't have borders in the same way countries do. As we see the launch of the Government’s 25 year environment plan, we need to keep the pressure on to uphold and extend environmental protections. I’ll keep bugging the Government to ensure the highest possible environmental standards.”

Brexit a real Bug-bear for the environment, says Alex Mayer MEP

Beetles, bees and bugs, must not pay the price of Brexit, Alex Mayer MEP warned this week as she visited the Peterborough charity Buglife. The MEP’s visit comes as the Government...

Wind FarmAhead of a key vote in the European Parliament on renewable energy targets Alex Mayer MEP visited Ransonmoor Wind Farm, near Doddington.

2017 was the greenest year since the Industrial Revolution for the UK, with onshore wind farms and renewable energy sources, like the turbines at Ransonmoor, outproducing coal plants on more than 75% of days of the year. 

The five turbines at the Ransonmoor site, in operation since 2007, produce 26 GWH of electricity per annum, enough to power 6,600 homes for a year.

The Euro MP will meet Matthew Clayton, Managing Director of Thrive renewables to discuss what a stretching but realistic percentage of electricity a country produces should come from renewable sources. 

Ms. Mayer said “It’s great to get to see a wind turbine up close and clear up some of the misconceptions surrounding them. “The success of wind farms in Fenland should be a source of inspiration. I’ll be calling for us to build on our success and step up ambitious targets for renewable energy in 2030.”

 

Fenland Wind Farms Forefront In Winds Of Change

Ahead of a key vote in the European Parliament on renewable energy targets Alex Mayer MEP visited Ransonmoor Wind Farm, near Doddington. 2017 was the greenest year since the Industrial...


View More Activities

The Labour Party will place cookies on your computer to help us make this website better.

Please read this to review the updates about which cookies we use and what information we collect on our site.

To find out more about these cookies, see our privacy notice. Use of this site confirms your acceptance of these cookies.